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VNA of Care New England

Spring Cleaning Safety Tips

How to avoid accidental poisonings from chemicals, medications
SATURDAY, April 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- While doing their spring cleaning, families will use a wide range of products that can cause accidental poisonings, an expert says.
But taking appropriate precautions will reduce the risk of danger, said Earl Siegel, managing director of the drug and poison information center at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center in Ohio.
"It is vital that people arm themselves with basic information on poison prevention in the home, such as keeping chemicals out of the reach of children and carefully reading the labels and dosages on all products," he said in a hospital news release.
Tips for preventing poisonings during spring cleaning are offered by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
Keep cleaning products in their original bottles or containers. Don't store them in cups, bottles or jars. Never sniff containers to determine what's inside.
Keep cleaning products locked up and out of sight and reach of children.
Read the label before you use a cleaning product. And never mix products together; doing so could create a dangerous gas.
Open windows and turn on fans when using cleaners or other chemicals. Also, wear protective clothing -- long sleeves, long pants, socks, shoes and gloves -- if you're spraying pesticides or other chemicals. Stay away from newly sprayed areas for at least an hour, or until the spray has dried.
If you clean out your medicine cabinet, keep all medicines out of the sight and reach of children while you're working.
If a poisoning occurs, call the Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222 immediately.
More information
The U.S. National Safety Council has more about poisoning prevention (http://www.nsc.org/safety_home/Resources/Pages/Poisoning.aspx ).
SOURCE: Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, news release, April 17, 2014
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