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VNA of Care New England
VNA of Care New England

Interferon-Free Combo of ABT-450, Ritonavir Helpful for Hep C

Second study shows sustained virologic response with daclatasvir + sofosbuvir in genotypes 1, 2, 3
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with an interferon-free combination of the protease inhibitor ABT-450 with ritonavir, or daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir, is associated with high rates of sustained virologic response in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, according to two studies published in the Jan. 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
Kris V. Kowdley, M.D., from Mason Medical Center in Seattle, and colleagues conducted a phase 2b open-label study to evaluate multiple regimens of antiviral agents and ribavirin in 571 patients with HCV genotype 1 who had not received or not responded to treatment previously. The researchers found that for previously untreated patients who received three direct-acting antiviral agents (including ABT-450 with ritonavir) plus ribavirin, the sustained virologic response at 24 weeks was 88 percent with eight weeks of therapy and 95 percent for 12 weeks of therapy.
Mark S. Sulkowski, M.D., from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and colleagues conducted an open-label study involving 211 patients with HCV genotype 1 (previously untreated or with previous virologic failure with telaprevir or boceprevir), 2, or 3 infection who were randomized to receive daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir with or without ribavirin. The researchers found that 98 percent of patients with genotype 1 infection had a sustained virologic response at week 12 after therapy. Sustained virologic response at week 12 was 92 percent for genotype 2 and 89 percent for genotype 3. In addition, high rates of sustained virologic response at week 12 were seen among patients who received ribavirin and those who did not (94 and 98 percent, respectively).
"Once-daily oral daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir was associated with high rates of sustained virologic response among patients infected with HCV genotype 1, 2, or 3," Sulkowski and colleagues write.
The Kowdley study was funded by AbbVie. The Sulkowski study was funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pharmasset (Gilead).
Full Text - Kowdley (subscription or payment may be required) (http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1306227 )Full Text - Sulkowski (subscription or payment may be required) (http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1306218?query=featured_home )
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