About Us  |  Contact Us  |  Español
VNA of Care New England
VNA of Care New England

CDC: Lung Cancer Incidence in U.S. Down From 2005 to 2009

Decrease more rapid among men than women, among those aged 35-44 versus other age groups
MONDAY, Jan. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- From 2005 to 2009, the incidence of lung cancer decreased among men and women in the United States, according to a study published in the Jan. 10 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
Lung cancer is currently the leading cause of cancer death among men and women in the United States. S. Jane Henley, M.S.P.H., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues examined lung cancer data from the National Program of Cancer Registries and the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program for 2005 to 2009. The authors sought to assess lung cancer incidence and trends among men and women by age group.
The researchers found that lung cancer incidence decreased among men of all ages, except those aged younger than 35 years. Among women, incidence decreased among those aged 35 to 44 and 54 to 64 years. The decrease was more rapid among men than women, and among those aged 35 to 44 years compared with other age groups.
"To further reduce lung cancer incidence in the United States, proven population-based tobacco prevention and control strategies should receive sustained attention and support," the authors write.
More Information (http://www.cdc.gov/Mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6301a1.htm?s_cid=mm6301a1_ww )
Health Headlines
4 Steps Could Quell Ebola in West Africa, Researchers SayView in a lightbox
Fewer Malpractice Claims Paid in U.S.View in a lightbox
Halloween Safety Tips for Kids With AsthmaView in a lightbox
World Bank Pledges $100M More to Fight West Africa's Ebola OutbreakView in a lightbox
Health Tip: Dress Kids in Safe Halloween CostumesView in a lightbox
VNA of Care New England
© 2011 Site Index | Disclaimer | Legal Notices | Talks Your Health