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VNA of Care New England

Low-Fat Fish Oil Diet Beneficial in Prostate Cancer

Affects levels of pro-inflammatory molecules, omega fatty acids, measure of cancer growth
THURSDAY, Nov. 21, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- In men with prostate cancer, a low-fat fish oil diet is associated with lower serum levels of pro-inflammatory molecules, changes in serum levels of omega fatty acids, and a lower measure of cancer growth, compared with a Western diet, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in Cancer Prevention Research.
Colette Galet, Ph.D., from the University of California in Los Angeles, and colleagues compared serum levels of fatty acids and pro-inflammatory eicosanoids as well as cell cycle progression score in men with prostate cancer who had been randomly assigned to a low-fat fish oil diet (20 percent of calories from fat) or a Western diet (40 percent of calories from fat) for four to six weeks.
The researchers found that men on the fish oil diet had significantly lower serum levels of omega-6 fatty acids and 15(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), higher serum levels of omega-3 fatty acids, and a significantly lower cell cycle progression score compared with men on a Western diet. Leukotriene B4 levels were similar in both groups.
"In conclusion, a low-fat fish oil diet resulted in decreased 15(S)-HETE levels and lower cell cycle progression score relative to a Western diet," Galet and colleagues write.
The study was the result of work supported with resources and the use of facilities at Myriad Genetics Laboratories.
Abstract (http://cancerpreventionresearch.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2013/10/29/1940-6207.CAPR-13-0261.abstract )Full Text (subscription or payment may be required) (http://cancerpreventionresearch.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2013/10/29/1940-6207.CAPR-13-0261.full.pdf+html )
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