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VNA of Care New England
VNA of Care New England

Alzheimer's Association International Conference, July 13-18, 2013

The Alzheimer's Association International Conference (https://www.alz.org/aaic/about/highlights.asp )
The annual meeting of the Alzheimer's Association was held from June 13 to 18 in Boston and attracted more than 4,000 participants from around the world, including researchers, dementia specialists, and neurologists. The conference featured the latest advances in Alzheimer's disease and related dementias, with presentations focusing on the identification, prevention, treatment, and management of Alzheimer's disease, mild cognitive impairment, dementia, and associated conditions.
In one study, Clifford Jack Jr., M.D., of the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues updated their Alzheimer's disease model so it may serve as a practical framework for empirically establishing the temporal ordering of biomarker events throughout all phases of the disease.
"We have revised our model of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers based on hands-on experience and in response to new data that has become available since the model was first published in 2010," said Jack. "The new (2013) model incorporates a number of changes that make this framework more practical for empirical testing. The model also now incorporates well established autopsy data indicating that brainstem and medial temporal tauopathy usually precedes amyloid deposition."
Press Release (http://www.alz.org/aaic/_releases_2013/tues_345pm_biomarker.asp )
In the Gammaglobulin Alzheimer's Partnership (GAP) study, Norman Relkin, M.D., Ph.D., of the New York Presbyterian-Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, and colleagues found that intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) cannot be recommended for general use in treating Alzheimer's patients at this time.
"The GAP study did not find that IVIG was effective for treating Alzheimer's in the dose range tested. IVIG was shown to be reasonably well tolerated and safe in the elderly Alzheimer's patients who volunteered for the study. It engaged biological targets believed to be relevant to Alzheimer's disease; in particular, it reduced beta amyloid levels in the blood and brain," said Relkin. "The results demonstrate that it is possible to significantly raise levels of antibodies in spinal fluid, including anti-amyloid antibodies, by repeated injection of IVIG into the blood. The GAP study also provided some suggestion that APOE genotype and stage of disease may be factors that influence response to IVIG."
Press Release (http://www.alz.org/aaic/_releases_2013/tues_830am_ivig.asp )
Rebecca Amariglio, Ph.D., of Brigham and Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, and colleagues found that self-reported concerns about memory may be an indicator of amyloid burden in individuals who are otherwise considered cognitively normal.
"In a sample of clinically-normal older individuals, we found that a greater amount of concerns with memory corresponded with a greater amount of amyloid build-up in the brain," said Amariglio. "The findings have significant implications for secondary prevention trials that are getting underway, which will be looking for individuals who are more likely to have amyloid deposition as well as be at greater risk for Alzheimer's disease progression. Concerns about memory will help to screen individuals for these trials."
Press Release (https://www.alz.org/aaic/_releases_2013/wed_130pm_decline.asp )
AAIC: Population Screening for Dementia Has No Benefit
WEDNESDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Population screening for dementia requires substantial resources yet has no benefits in terms of clinical or psychosocial outcomes, according to research presented at the annual Alzheimer's Association International Conference, held from July 13 to 18 in Boston.
Press Release (https://www.alz.org/aaic/_releases_2013/wed_830am_dev_topics.asp )More Information (https://www.alz.org/aaic/ )
AAIC: Older Retirement Age Protects Against Dementia
MONDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Retiring at an older age is associated with a reduced risk of dementia, according to a study presented at the annual Alzheimer's Association International Conference, held from July 13 to 18 in Boston.
Press Release (https://www.alz.org/aaic/_releases_2013/mon_830am_cancer_chemo.asp )More Information (https://www.alz.org/aaic/ )
AAIC: Cancer Survival Tied to Decreased Alzheimer's Risk
MONDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Being a cancer survivor and having been treated with chemotherapy seem to confer a protective effect against Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study presented at the annual Alzheimer's Association International Conference, held from July 13 to 18 in Boston.
Press Release (https://www.alz.org/aaic/_releases_2013/mon_830am_cancer_chemo.asp )More Information (https://www.alz.org/aaic/ )
AAIC: Metformin Treatment Linked to Lower Dementia Risk
MONDAY, July 15 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who initiate treatment with metformin have a lower risk of developing dementia, according to a study presented at the annual Alzheimer's Association International Conference, held from July 13 to 18 in Boston.
Press Release (https://www.alz.org/aaic/_releases_2013/mon_830am_cancer_chemo.asp )More Information (https://www.alz.org/aaic/ )
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