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Color of Cutlery Could Change How Food Tastes

Finding might be used as a way to encourage better eating habits, researchers say
THURSDAY, June 27, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- The size, weight, shape and color of your cutlery can affect how food tastes, a new study suggests.
In the research, participants thought white yogurt tasted sweeter than pink-colored yogurt when eaten from a white spoon, but the reverse was true when a black spoon was used.
These findings could help people improve their eating habits by reducing portion sizes or the amount of salt they add to their food, the researchers said.
"How we experience food is a multisensory experience involving taste, the feel of the food in our mouths, aroma and the feasting of our eyes," said Vanessa Harrar and Charles Spence of the University of Oxford, in the United Kingdom. "Even before we put food into our mouths, our brains have made a judgment about it, which affects our overall experience."
They found that yogurt seemed denser and more expensive when eaten from a plastic spoon. White yogurt was rated sweeter, more liked and more expensive than pink-colored yogurt when they were eaten from a white spoon. These effects were reversed when the two colors of yogurt were eaten from a black spoon.
When participants were offered cheese on a knife, spoon, fork or toothpick, they said the cheese from the knife tasted saltiest, according to the study, which was published in the journal Flavour.
"Subtly changing eating implements and tableware can affect how pleasurable, or filling, food appears," Harrar said. "When serving a dish, one should keep in mind that the color of the food appears different depending on the background on which it is presented and, therefore, tastes different."
This may also be used to help control eating patterns such as portion size or how much salt is added to food. Alternatively, people may be able to make better food choices if their ingrained color associations are disrupted by less constant advertising and packaging.
Previous research has shown that the weight and color of a plate can alter peoples' perceptions of how dense, salty or sweet food tastes.
More information
The U.S. National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders has more about taste and taste disorders (http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/smelltaste/pages/taste.aspx ).
SOURCE: Flavour, news release, June 25, 2013
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