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VNA of Care New England
VNA of Care New England

Talking to Your Doctor About Obesity

You have a unique medical history. Therefore, it is essential to talk with your doctor about your personal risk factors and/or experience with obesity. By talking openly and regularly with your doctor, you can take an active role in your care.
Here are some tips that will make it easier for you to talk to your doctor:
  • Bring someone else with you. It helps to have another person hear what is said and think of questions to ask.
  • Write out your questions ahead of time so you don't forget them.
  • Write down the answers you get, and make sure you understand what you are hearing. Ask for clarification, if necessary.
  • Don't be afraid to ask your questions or ask where you can find more information about what you are discussing. You have a right to know.
  • Where do my weight, medical history, and family history place me on the risk scale for obesity-related diseases?
  • What should my weight reducing efforts be?
  • Is it possible that a medical condition is responsible for my excess weight?
  • Are there signs of complications emerging because of my weight? Which ones are the most dangerous?
  • What else can I do besides exercising and eating right?
  • Which treatment options do you specifically recommend for me?
  • When should I be referred to a dietitian for help with my diet?
  • Do I need to see a specialist in bariatric surgery or endocrinology?
  • Can my spouse, care provider, parent, food preparer, or other family member join our treatment discussions? These individuals are going to have to help me change my eating habits.
  • What changes do I need to make in my diet?
  • I’m concerned that my children are overweight. What can I do?
  • What are the best exercises to help me lose weight?
  • Can you recommend an athletic trainer or fitness facility in my area?
  • Where can I get more information about weight loss?
  • Is there a counselor you recommend who is particularly good with overweight patients?
  • Can you recommend a support group?

References

Obesity. Merck Manual for Health Care Professionals website. Available at: http://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/nutritional%5Fdisorders/obesity%5Fand%5Fthe%5Fmetabolic%5Fsyndrome/obesity.html?qt=obesity in adults&alt=sh. Update November 2012. Accessed March 20, 2013.

Obesity in adults. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated August 16, 2012. Accessed August 28, 2012.

Obesity in children and adolescents. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed. Updated July 25, 2012. Accessed August 28, 2012.

Revision Information

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