About Us  |  Contact Us  |  Español
VNA of Care New England
VNA of Care New England

Talking to Your Doctor About End-stage Renal Disease (ESRD)

You have a unique medical history. Therefore, it is important to talk with your doctor about your personal risk factors and/or experience with end-stage renal disease. By talking openly and regularly with your doctor, you can take an active role in your care.
Here are some tips that will make it easier for you to talk to your doctor:
  • Bring someone else with you. It helps to have another person hear what is said and ask questions you may not have thought of.
  • Write your questions ahead of time, so you don't forget them.
  • Write down the answers you get. Make sure you understand what you are hearing. Ask for clarification, if necessary.
  • Don't be afraid to ask your questions or ask for more information. You have a right to know.
  • Have my kidneys permanently and totally failed?
  • Do you have any handouts or information that I may take with me?
  • Based on my medical history, lifestyle, and family background, am I at risk for a renal failure?
  • What can I do to help prevent renal failure?
  • Are there any medications available to help me?
  • What are the benefits and side effects of medications?
  • Are there any alternative or complementary therapies I should look into?
  • Will I be cured?
  • What type of dialysis do you recommend? Why?
  • What are the complications of the different types of dialysis?
  • Am I a candidate for a kidney transplant?
  • How do I get on a transplant list?
  • What tests do you do to locate a good match for me?
  • How long is the wait to get a good match?
  • What are the complications after the transplant?
  • How long do I need to take the immunosuppression drugs after the transplant?
  • What are some common side effects of these drugs?
  • Can I exercise?
    • What type of exercise is best?
    • How much should I be exercising?
    • How do I get started with an exercise program?
  • Should I make any dietary changes? How do I go about it?
    • Should I see a dietitian?
    • Should I stop drinking alcohol?
  • Should I check my blood pressure at home? How do I go about it?
    • At what level should I maintain my blood pressure?
    • What should I do if my pressure goes above a certain level?
    • How often will you monitor my blood pressure and cholesterol level?
    • How do I know if my blood pressure is within healthy limits?
  • How often will you check my blood mineral levels?
  • Will I be able to live a normal life?
  • Will I be able to work and travel?
  • How long will dialysis take and what will it be like?
  • Will I die without dialysis?

References

Chronic kidney disease. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: http://www.ebscohost.com/dynamed . Updated April 22, 2013. Accessed July 2, 2013.

End-stage renal disease. National Institute of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases website. Available at: http://www2.niddk.nih.gov/Research/ScientificAreas/Kidney/KEB.htm Updated September 15, 2010. Accessed July 2, 2013.

Revision Information

Health Headlines
How to Keep Your Fitness Goals on TrackView in a lightbox
If Kids Think Someone's Watching, They're More Likely to Wash Their HandsView in a lightbox
Spring Cleaning Safety TipsView in a lightbox
Ragwitek Approved for Adult Ragweed AllergyView in a lightbox
Restaurants in Poor Areas Push Unhealthy Foods, Study FindsView in a lightbox
VNA of Care New England
© 2011 Site Index | Disclaimer | Legal Notices